Items in the Box, 2 x Scope Probes, USB Oscilloscope, CD, and USB cable

I picked up a Hantek 6022BE USB Oscilloscope as sometimes its useful to have something more than just a multimeter for seeing what a circuit is doing. While the specification makes it more of a toy than a real instrument, however what can you expect for £46.00?

The Hantek 6022BE is a 2 Channel 20 MHz scope with the following specification:

Channel 2 Channels
Bandwidth 20MHz
Input Impedance 1MΩ 25pF
Max. Sample rate 48MS/s
Coupling DC
Vertical resolution 8Bit
Gain range 10mV-5V, 9Steps
DC accuracy ±3%
Timebase range 4ns-5ks
Vertical adjustable Yes
Input protection Diode clamping
X-Y Yes
EXT. input No
Trigger Mode Auto, Normal and Single
Trigger Slope +/-
Trigger level adjustable Yes
Trigger Type Rising edge, falling edge
Trigger Source CH1, CH2
Pre/Post trigger 0-100%
Buffer size 1M
Sampling selection Yes
Waveform Display port/line, waveform average, persistence, intensity
Network Open/Close
Vertical mode CH1, CH2, Dual, ADD
Cursor measurement Yes
Math FFT, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division.
Cursor Frequency, Voltage
Accessories Hantek 6022 BE CD, probes (Hantek Probe instructions), Hantek 6022 BE Manual, USB cord

So out the box:

Inside the unit

I don’t really want to take mine apart just yet to get pics of the inside, however thanks to Fraser on the EEV Blog forum we have the following images (original copyright to Fraser).

The key components are as follows:

  • CY7C68013A-100AXC
  • 24LC02 EEPROM
  • Dual Channel ADC with glued on heat-sink. Likely to be a 40MHZ AD device.
  • Analogue input channels. Each contain 74HC4051, 5 pin ‘HRA’ amplifier, Qty 2 in cascade and a 3 pin ‘A7’ device.
  • AMS1117 3v3 regulator

There are positions on the PCB for another CY7C68013A-100AXC, 24LC02 and a SMSC USB2512A USB Hub. These would provide a 16 Channel Logic Analyser function to the unit (The Hantek 6022BL comes with the additional Logic Analyser and is listed at £69.99 (HT6022BL Software)).

There is also a position for a 5V supply. Interestingly, the only components needed are a socket and a diode. There is no polyfuse in the external supply rail unlike the USB feed. I assume that this is a ‘just in case’ an external supply turned out to be needed latter, given that the USB cable supplied is twin USB A to single B.

Hantek USBIX 1070C

Hantek USBIX 1070C

On the right hand end of the PCB is the USBIX interface for connecting it to a frame like the USBXI-1070A or USBXI-1070C (these seem to be unavailable), this allows up to 6 or 7 different bits of Hantek test equipment to be put together (the A has an internal computer, the C is USB attached to an external computer). A list of some of the supported modules is here.

Software

So far this is all I have done with the Oscilloscope, I don’t know how sharp the rise time is on the 1kHz 2V Peak to Peak reference source is, or what the slew rate on the signal is, I will have a look at these at some point, also I may open it up and try and clean up the noise.